The Grand Ole Opry House is an iconic music venue that hosts talented and popular artists while also showcasing the longest-running radio broadcast in American history. The show includes renowned, groundbreaking singers, both traditional and modern, performing country, bluegrass, Americana, folk, and gospel music interspersed with comedic skits. The Grand Ole Opry began in 1925 on WSM Radio and has been through multiple changes in venue, with the last being from the Ryman Auditorium to the current Opry House.

    With such distinct culture and resolute tradition, the Grand Ole Opry House attracts hundreds of thousands of international visitors and millions more radio and internet listeners. Performances are broadcast live every week, and the venue hosts additional shows for special events throughout the year. Don't hesitate to bring the whole family along to enjoy a show at this largely family-friendly venue.

    Grand Ole Opry House in Nashville - one of the highlights of 10 Best Things to Do After Dinner in Nashville (Read all about Nashville here)

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    What are the highlights of Grand Ole Opry House in Nashville?

    The highlights of Grand Ole Opry House tend to center around the artists themselves. As one of the most popular country music venues in the nation, absolute legends have made a name for themselves here. When you visit, you'll be able to experience a place that made history, and you'll have a chance to see national artists that are some of the most popular in their genre.

    In addition to the always-impressive lineup, you'll find that the Grand Ole Opry House's stage itself is quite notable. It manages to seamlessly incorporate modern technology and rustic decor to create a traditional experience with unrivaled, high-quality sound. The background of the stage evokes images of an old barn house, which is something commonly associated with the country music genre, but you'll find high-tech lighting used throughout performances as well.

    A brief history of Grand Ole Opry House in Nashville

    The Grand Ole Opry House dates back decades, though it's much younger than the Opry show itself. The venue was established as the new home of the Opry in 1974 after the show outgrew the 3,000-seat Ryman Auditorium. The Grand Ole Opry House was created as a larger, new, air-conditioned theater in a less urbanized part of town to avoid urban decay.

    When the Grand Ole Opry House held its first show in 1974, President Nixon was in attendance. To remember its roots, a piece of the Ryman's stage was cut off and inlaid in the stage of the new venue. This oak circle measured about 6 feet, and it's often the center spot from which musicians perform to honor the venue and show's roots. That tradition still continues to this day.

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    What else is good to know about Grand Ole Opry House in Nashville?

    Before visiting the Grand Ole Opry House, there are a few factors to keep in mind. Despite the big-name performances held here, there isn't an official dress code, as they themselves say they're fine whether you're wearing faded jeans and a cowboy hat or a business suit. Additionally, seating times vary based on the event, but they're generally 30 minutes to an hour before showtime.

    Visiting the Grand Ole Opry House will put you close to several other iconic attractions as well. The Opry Mills Shopping Mall is just a short distance to the south and offers shops, restaurants, and even an escape game. Head north through Music Valley, and you'll find yourself at Nashville Palace, another prominent live music venue. If you want to head downtown, you'll have to go a few miles west past the Cumberland River.

    Grand Ole Opry House in Nashville

    Location: 2804 Opryland Dr, Nashville, TN 37214, USA

    Open: Daily from10 am to 4 pm and Tuesday, Friday–Saturday from 5.30 pm to 9.30 pm

    Phone: +1 615-871-6779

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